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CONCURRENT SESSIONS: Sunday, Oct. 24
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE! ~ see speaker bios

DIGESTING THE ALPHABET SOUP OF VISITOR MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORKS FOR TRAILS AND GREENWAYS (Room: 5-A&B)

This is a presentation on the wide variety of visitor management frameworks (ROS, VIM, VERP, VAMP, QUAL, etc.), their history, their purpose, and their application toward management of trails, trails networks, and greenways. The purpose of this presentation is to provide trails professionals with comparisons and contrasts of currently and previously used visitor management frameworks so that they may adapt all or part of these management techniques to their areas.

Speaker: Greg Beilfuss, Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands, Indiana University-Bloomington

TREAD LIGHTLY!: HELPING SUSTAIN TRAILS INTO THE FUTURE (Room: 6-A)

At Tread Lightly!, we're looking to establish collaborative partnerships with land managers, trail users and other stakeholders on solutions big and small to help empower generations to recreate responsibly in the outdoors. The programs developed over 15 years to address the immense challenges that lie before us will be described and the effective means of utilizing these programs will be discussed. Tread Lightly!, a non-profit organization, will share specific examples of what efforts and tools are being provided for land managers and users that can improve and sustain trail conditions and capacity, maintain access to current recreational areas, and minimize user conflicts.

Speaker: Dianne Olson, Training and Education Specialist, Tread Lightly

CORPS AND TRAILS: A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE CONNECTION FOR AMERICA'S YOUTH (Room: 6-B)

This presentation will introduce participants to the more than 100 service and conservation corps around this nation and demonstrate the benefits of corps-trail partnerships for both young adults and their communities. Today's corps teaches trail construction, maintenance and designing skills. Trail and greenway managers have increasingly come to rely on the nation's corps to help accomplish a variety of trail projects in a cost-effective manner. Involving youth corps participants in community trail projects helps develop the next generation of trail builders and advocates and also engages them in vigorous work and a healthier lifestyle.

Speakers: Matt Ferris, Fund Development and Marketing Coordinator, National Association of Service and Conservation Corps; Parc Smith, Projects Supervisor, American YouthWorks

TRAILS IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT — OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND (Room: 7)

This session would showcase 4 to 5 very different trail types, all within one large metropolitan area, and all with their own unique constraints and opportunities. These types range from a trail built on top of a large water transmission line, to a trail along a former rail corridor (the Katy trail), to the conversion of a mile long rail trestle into a trail, to levee top trails and trails in natural areas (along the Trinity River). Each is unique in the lessons learned, as well as the process of getting the trail funded and built.

Moderator: Jim Carrillo, Director of Planning, Halff Associates Inc.

Speakers: Annie Melton, AICP, President, Bowman Melton Associates, Inc.; Lenny Hughes, Director of Landscape Architecture, Halff Associates Inc.; Bud Melton, APBP, Vice-President, Bowman Melton Associates, Inc.

RETROFITTING EXISTING TRAILS FOR MOUNTAIN BIKING USE (Room: 8-A&B)

The vast majority of what are now shared-use trails were originally created for hiking use. The expanded spectrum of users on these trails requires design modifications for sustainability and user experience. The International Mountain Bicycling Association has worked for 8 years to make such trails compatible for mountain bike use. Participants will come away with the understanding of key design features required on trails with mountain bike use and how to apply them to their own shared-use trail system.

Speakers: Chris Bernhardt, Subaru/IMBA Trail Care Crew, International Mountain Bicycling Association; Jill Van Winkle, Subaru/IMBA Trail Care Crew, International Mountain Bicycling Association

TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND PUBLIC HEALTH (Room: 8-C)

Participants in this session will take a ride along the trail from the federal to the local level, stopping to identify partnership opportunities between the public health community and transportation planners at designated stops along the way. At the trailhead, we will explore the scientific basis for the overweight/obesity epidemic, and hear about U.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway Administration programs designed to combat overweight/obesity and to create practical transportation infrastructure planning tools. At mile marker #2, the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy will identify key collaboration opportunities that are missed in many communities between local public health departments and trail planners. At mile marker #3, the Texas Department of State Health Services Physical Activity coordinator will share public healthÕs perspective on the importance of trails and trail networks as well as recount some success stories from Texas. Finally, at the trailÕs end, we will meet up to brainstorm with the group how trails and public health can work together in your state or community.

Speakers: Dr. David Belluck, Senior Transportation Toxicologist, USDOT/FHWA; Melanie Mintz, Project Coordinator, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, California; Kristy Hansen, M.Ed., CHES, Physical Activity Program Specialist, Department of State Health Services

TRAIL SAFETY AND CONFLICT REDUCTION FORUM (Room: 9-A)

The mileage of multiuse trails is growing exponentially — especially in urban areas. These trails are becoming increasingly popular and in turn becoming more crowded in many areas. With this growth, there is a need to address growing concerns of safety, conflict reduction, and security. There is also a need to develop better systems for assembling and managing trail safety and security data. This session and forum will address ways to make multiuse trails safer and more secure. Four of the nation's leading trail use experts and agency managers will share ideas, research results, and planning solutions aimed at reducing crashes, incidents, and crime.

Moderator: Christopher B Douwes, Trails and Enhancements Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration

Speakers: Roger Moore, Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, North Carolina State University; Ken Foelske, Manager of Planning and Development, Jefferson County Open Space; H. Bill Woodcock, Manager of Planning & Construction, South Suburban Parks and Recreation

REGIONAL VELOWEB — PLANNING FOR THE DALLAS-FORT WORTH BICYCLE HIGHWAY (Room: 9-B)

Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas' largest metropolitan region anticipates swelling from 6 to 10 million people by 2030. To prepare for this immense growth, NCTCOG is weaving together a seamless regional trail system using river, utility and other rights of way spanning 4 counties and 650 miles. By planning facilities at the regional level, cities can align similar facilities with neighboring cities, creating a cohesive, compatible trail system to transit, schools, shopping, and work. This session identifies avenues to plan and fund regional trail facilities by fostering cooperation among municipalities and describes guidelines for trail design and identification of right of ways.

Speaker: Jared White, Transportation Planner II, North Central Texas Council of Governments

USER NEEDS AND IMPROVED OHV MANAGEMENT — PLANNING TRAILS WITH PARTNERS (Room: 10-A)

Federal agency representatives will discuss determining user needs for trail systems and how partnerships play an important function in this effort. Participants will be able to match the niche of their particular organization and area with user need in trail planning efforts. Trail users will be able to present their needs in a manner that is easy for land managers to interpret. Session will be interactive with participants. Case study examples of what is working well across the nation will be presented and the outcome will assist land mangers in providing trail experiences that meet American lifestyle and that are environmentally sustainable.

Moderator: John Favro, Trails and Dispersed Recreation Program Manager, USDA Forest Service

Speakers: Mary Hughes Frye, Regional OHV Program Manger ,USDA Forest Service; Robin Fehlau, Bureau of Land Management; Anna Atkinson, Bureau of Land Management

CREATING COMMUNITY THROUGH TRAILS (Room: 10-B)

With the American lifestyle growing more hectic, Americans are discovering the benefits of neighborhood trails as a way of staying in touch with nature and their community. This presentation details the role of trails as a neighborhood-planning element and explores the strategies of trails in two very different lifestyle trends: Traditional Neighborhood Developments and Conservation Neighborhoods. Providing attendees a better understanding of the challenges and benefits seen from both the community developer and land planner point of view, the presentation includes an in-depth look at well-planned trails and a deeper appreciation of trails as an important tool for creating places for people.

Speakers: Sean Compton, Land Planner, TBG Partners; Chris Allen, Managing Partner, Woodson Place; Dale Thornton, Assistant Manager of Land Development, D.R. Horton Homes

Return to the Concurrent Sessions schedule ~ see speaker bios

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE!